Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Waterless Sea

“To the layman, cities in ice, horizons suspended as a shimmer above the earth and mountains of spectral beauty may appear complex, but the science is relatively simple. Light bends as it plunges through different air densities or temperatures. Similarly, the water ripples in desert mirages and heat haze shimmer are simply by-products of the volatility of the heat gradient. Such atmospheric optics are, however, the least interesting attributes of the mirage. Pinney’s fascination rests in the complicity at the heart of the mirage. As he points out, ‘the act of beholding involves an erasure of this distantiating knowledge.’ In short, the mirage cannot exist without the visual, cultural and epistemological template of the onlooker, whose interpretations invest magic into pretty, if otherwise meaningless, refractions of light.”

– from my review of The Waterless Sea: A Curious History of Mirages (reprinted)

Pitch Festival / Kent, England

I will be speaking about the romance of intimacy and attachment at one of England’s coolest and fastest-growing family-friendly music festivals, Pitch. Three days, 30 bands, 10 DJs, workshops, happenings, camping, solar showers, water, parking and kids under 16 free!

Dates: 17 to 19 August 2018

Buy your tickets soon as they’ve almost sold out – https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/pitch-festival-2018-tickets-42797931766

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BroadstairsLit / Meet the authors

September 27 2018 – mark it in your diary! If you’re in London, hop on a coach (madly inexpensive) or grab a cheap train ticket for a day on the beach. I’m on with a number of fabulously funny and intriguing other authors – and a band, Shedness – so you are guaranteed an eclectic and madly stimulating evening. Oh, and I’ll be signing books. Antonella x

To book a place (gratis): BroadstairsLit

BroadstairsLit

The Waterless Sea: A Curious History of Mirages / Christopher Pinney

“And yet it is in this glamour or promise that Pinney locates the mirage’s transhistorical ­appeal: ‘A delusive persuasiveness that even men of science could not deny.’ This willingness to be duped by a beautiful delusion has its roots in that which Joseph ­Addison called ‘the pleasures of the imagination’. In the First World, the closest most of us come to a mirage is through unwise love, the illusion of union where there is nothing other than the refraction of hope.”

– from my review of Christopher Pinney’s “The Waterless Sea: A Curious History of Mirages”

The_Waterless_Sea_A_Curious_History_of_Mirages_by_Christopher_Pinney

Tziporah Malkah / Antonella Gambotto-Burke

“’He’d been masturbating,’ she says, her throat thickening with disgust. ‘At first, I didn’t quite know what it was – I kind of did, but wasn’t sure. And I gasped, shocked. I cried, ‘Gross! You’re gross! That’s disgusting!’ And he said, ‘Kiss me!’ He just kept coming for me. I left. It was only a short walk to the model’s apartment. I remember going home and saying, ‘He just put something on my face!’ One of the older girls – and by ‘older’, I mean 17 or 18 – we were all living together in a bunk room – said, ‘That’s his sperm.’”

– from my interview with Tziporah Malkah aka Kate Fischer in The Neighbourhood today.

Tziporah_Malkah_Kate_Fischer

Fairies: A Dangerous History / Richard Sugg

“Were fairies, say, a species of half-life ­perceived only at a certain frequency in half-light, there would be no place for them in today’s gridlock of manufactured — and brain-altering — electromagnetic waves. Context, then, may be said to determine ­perception. Presenting mythology as a blanket in which cultures wrap themselves, Sugg writes: ‘This, then, was a natural world with few, if any, blank or meaningless spaces.'”

– from my review of Fairies: A Dangerous History

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#ibelieveinfairies

Mothers: An Essay on Love + Cruelty / Jacqueline Rose

“What, in the end, is Rose arguing? That motherhood is wrongly sentimentalised or that she feels excluded by mothers who do not ­experience ambivalence in their role? That mothers should be heard? Of course we urgently need a revision of cultural­ — and, concomitantly, political — prioritie­s, but such changes will never be implemented if we continue insisting on the same modalities in which meaning is externalised and love sacrificed to status.”

– from my review of Mothers: An Essay on Love and Cruelty

Mothers_An_Essay

Girl Power / The Mirror (UK)

I’ve had two of the biggest (sentimental) thrills of my professional life within a week: the most recent is appearing here with activist & 2014 Nobel prize winner Malala Yousafzai, Virginia Woolf, Maya Angelou, Emmeline Pankhurst and JK Rowling as one of the most inspiring international activists for women’s rights.

Bethesda nearly had a cardiac arrest over the fact that my quote is mentioned alongside Taylor Swift’s – wild shrieking could be heard as she danced around the house.

#girlpower #loveistruth #equalrights #womensrights #loveisrespect #respect